School – Superhero Teacher Tool Kit http://superheroteachertoolkit.com/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 23:54:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon.png School – Superhero Teacher Tool Kit http://superheroteachertoolkit.com/ 32 32 CA School for the Deaf All-Deaf Football Team to Play in Title Game – NBC Los Angeles https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/ca-school-for-the-deaf-all-deaf-football-team-to-play-in-title-game-nbc-los-angeles/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 23:54:22 +0000 https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/ca-school-for-the-deaf-all-deaf-football-team-to-play-in-title-game-nbc-los-angeles/ The history of high school football could be written on Saturday night, as the California School for the Deaf prepares to play its first-ever championship game. The Riverside Cubs won their first semifinal game last Friday, beating the Avalon High School 62-51. All team players and coaches are deaf and compete against hearing teams. The […]]]>

The history of high school football could be written on Saturday night, as the California School for the Deaf prepares to play its first-ever championship game.

The Riverside Cubs won their first semifinal game last Friday, beating the Avalon High School 62-51.

All team players and coaches are deaf and compete against hearing teams.

The school has lost every game for seven consecutive seasons. This year they are perfect 12-0.

The semi-final victory was the first time in the school’s 68-year history, and not just football, qualified for a semi-final match.

“It doesn’t matter if they win or lose, the heart they played with has been wonderful, that’s what inspired us all, the staff, the parents, everyone. We are just thrilled,” said the college principal Janelle Green after the semifinal victory.

Saturday is the big title game, with the potential for the Riverside School to go up to a championship victory.

“It’s a big deal,” said David Figueroa, a student at the school and an offensive lineman and defensive end for the football team. “It’s huge for me and for the football team.”

Their victory garnered the attention and support of family members and beyond.

“It’s overwhelming,” Cubs head coach Keith Adams said. “It’s been going on and on, I’ve been getting messages, you know, congratulations and wishes. My email is blowing up. I’ve had NFL head coaches – Tennessee Titans sent me congratulations . It’s just amazing. “

The Riverside Cubs play for the CIF South Section title against Faith Baptist High School in Canoga Park, with kick-off scheduled for 5 p.m. Saturday night.


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Children Injured By School End Up In Low Ability Groups, UK Study Finds | Primary schools https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/children-injured-by-school-end-up-in-low-ability-groups-uk-study-finds-primary-schools/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/children-injured-by-school-end-up-in-low-ability-groups-uk-study-finds-primary-schools/ Elementary school children who are placed in the lower ability group of their class exhibit increased levels of hyperactivity and emotional problems throughout childhood and early adolescence, according to groundbreaking new research. Although the impact of capacity pooling on children’s educational outcomes has been the subject of much research, the study by the Institute of […]]]>

Elementary school children who are placed in the lower ability group of their class exhibit increased levels of hyperactivity and emotional problems throughout childhood and early adolescence, according to groundbreaking new research.

Although the impact of capacity pooling on children’s educational outcomes has been the subject of much research, the study by the Institute of Education at University College London (UCL) focuses on behavioral and emotional outcomes. young people who find themselves in the weakest capacity groups at an early age.

The new findings, published in the journal Child Development, prompted researchers to call for children in low-capacity groups within classrooms to be closely monitored by their teachers to ensure their well-being is not compromised. .

The research, which examined the impact of clustering abilities at age seven on UK school children, is based on analyzing data from more than 7,000 pupils, who were periodically assessed for problems peer, emotional, hyperactivity and behavior until the age of 14.

The researchers found that children in lower ability groups exhibited more hyperactivity and emotional problems during the study period, compared to children who were not taught in ability groups. Children in the medium ability groups showed more hyperactivity than those outside the groups, while the higher-ranked children were less likely to show signs of hyperactivity than the ungrouped children.

The study is important because ability or achievement pooling is widely used in UK schools, with almost four in five primary schools (79%) using classroom ability pooling for seven year olds.

Students with similar achievement levels are grouped together on tables, but all students are taught by their regular teacher and support staff, and they usually follow the same curriculum but at different levels of difficulty to ensure that all students have an appropriate level of challenge.

According to UCL research, studies examining the impact of clustering of abilities on success have produced mixed results. The Education Endowment Fund, a charity that provides evidence-based resources designed to improve practice and learning in schools in England, has found that aggregating results in the classroom can lead to two more months of progress for some children, but this evidence was limited.

The UCL study calls for further research. Report author Dr Steven Papachristou said: “Our findings on the increase in emotional and behavioral problems in children placed in low capacity groups within the classroom highlight a significant challenge for use. and the implementation of capacity consolidation. Whether the academic benefits of clustering capacity within the classroom reported by some outweigh its shortcomings should be a priority for future research.

“To date, very little is known about the dynamics of learning, peer-to-peer processes, and the subtle effects of clustering of abilities in the classroom, especially in classes with extensive selective clustering.

“However, while the associations found in this study are causal, they suggest that children in lower ability groups within the classroom require close monitoring and support from their teachers to ensure their behavioral development and emotional is not compromised. “

Professor Eirini Flouri, another author, added: ‘Our study was the first general population study in the UK to explore the role of both clustering of abilities between classes and clustering of abilities within class in child mental health. We did not find any psychosocial advantages or psychosocial disadvantages for people in higher ability groups, either between classes or within the class.

“However, people in the lower groups within the class had consistently high levels of emotional and behavioral problems. Whether it’s because of stigma, or unfavorable social comparisons, or some other process remains to be tested.

The Education Ministry declined to comment on the study, saying it was up to schools to decide their approach to capacity pooling, taking into account the available evidence and the specific needs of their own students. He added that this breakdown of students by ability could help teachers give every child an appropriate education.


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School closed as police search for armed hijacking suspects in Sherborn https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/school-closed-as-police-search-for-armed-hijacking-suspects-in-sherborn/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 16:06:00 +0000 https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/school-closed-as-police-search-for-armed-hijacking-suspects-in-sherborn/ A police search on Wednesday for armed carjacking suspects in Sherborn forced authorities to close a school for the day. Police said suspects crashed a vehicle in Sherborn on North Main Street near the Natick town line that was stolen in a nearby town. Two men got out of the car and one attempted to […]]]>

A police search on Wednesday for armed carjacking suspects in Sherborn forced authorities to close a school for the day. Police said suspects crashed a vehicle in Sherborn on North Main Street near the Natick town line that was stolen in a nearby town. Two men got out of the car and one attempted to hijack another driver at gunpoint before fleeing the area, police said. Video from the scene showed several police vehicles surrounding a car that appears to have front damage on North Main Street. A telephone pole was also seen lying on the ground, and the area was closed to traffic. Officers with guns and police dogs searched neighbors’ yards. “It was scary because these two men are still at large,” said Amy Lawler, a resident. , Red alert. Just go back inside and keep the door locked, ”said resident John DeSalvo. The incident happened near Pine Hill Elementary School, which canceled classes for the day. Students living in Sherborn who attend Dover-Sherborn High School and Dover-Sherborn Regional Middle School have also been ordered out of school for the day. State police said the suspects also fled an earlier accident in Hopkinton. No arrests have been made and police continue to search for the couple.

A police search on Wednesday for armed carjacking suspects in Sherborn forced authorities to close a school for the day.

Police said suspects crashed a vehicle in Sherborn on North Main Street near the Natick town line that was stolen in a nearby town.

Two men got out of the car and one attempted to hijack another driver at gunpoint before fleeing the area, police said.

Video from the scene showed several police vehicles surrounding a car that appears to have front damage on North Main Street. A telephone pole was also seen lying on the ground, and the area was closed to traffic.

Officers with guns and police dogs searched neighbors’ yards.

“It was scary because these two men are still at large,” said resident Amy Lawler.

“When my wife came out to ask what was going on, they were like a red alert. Just go back inside and keep the door locked,” said resident John DeSalvo.

The incident happened near Pine Hill Elementary School, which canceled classes for the day.

Students living in Sherborn who attend Dover-Sherborn High School and Dover-Sherborn Regional Middle School have also been ordered out of school for the day.

The search led to a shelter in place at Natick High School and Memorial Elementary School which was later lifted.

State police said the suspects also fled an earlier accident in Hopkinton.

No arrests have been made and police continue to search for the couple.


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2 suburban school districts cancel classes for Thanksgiving week – NBC Chicago https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/2-suburban-school-districts-cancel-classes-for-thanksgiving-week-nbc-chicago/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 23:43:13 +0000 https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/2-suburban-school-districts-cancel-classes-for-thanksgiving-week-nbc-chicago/ Two suburban school districts canceled classes on Monday and Tuesday, giving students a longer Thanksgiving break, but leaving some parents to scramble and find last-minute child care arrangements. Evanston / Skokie School District 65, which serves K-8 students, previously announced it was canceling classes, in part to give educators and support staff time to rest […]]]>

Two suburban school districts canceled classes on Monday and Tuesday, giving students a longer Thanksgiving break, but leaving some parents to scramble and find last-minute child care arrangements.

Evanston / Skokie School District 65, which serves K-8 students, previously announced it was canceling classes, in part to give educators and support staff time to rest and focus on their mental health.

But in a letter to the school community, the district leadership explained that staff shortages also played a role.

Superintendent Dr Devon Horton said the school did not have sufficient staff or substitute teacher coverage to “provide necessary care or support high quality learning …” over the course of the period.

Horton explained that the district is aware that the move “can put working families at a standstill” and that it has attempted to connect with child care providers and community partners, but they didn’t. were unable to provide assistance due to their own staff shortage.

“My immediate reaction was a shock, quite surprised, admittedly a little frustrated not to have had more notice,” said Robert Greenbaum, whose 9-year-old son attends district school.

The neighborhood is not the only one to take such a step.

Hinsdale Township High School District 86 announced the extension of its Thanksgiving vacation last week, saying it was canceling classes Monday and Tuesday for students and employees “to rest, relax and rejuvenate.”

Hinsdale Township High School District 86 serves students in grades 9-12 and includes Hinsdale Central and South High Schools.

Mistie Psaledas, who has three daughters, including a freshman at Hinsdale Central, said she thought the change was “wonderful”.

“She’s also an athlete, so there are a lot of different pressures, so the fact that we can hang out … there is no rush in the morning, we can stay in pajamas even though I am working out.” , said the mother.

Although the sudden change in schedule can be frustrating at first, a psychologist calls it a “gift.”

“… And so I would encourage people to think about self-care, because I should be doing this and that. We should get things off our plate, rest and go slow, take a break and say no,” said Dr Colleen. Cira, founder of the Cira Center for Behavior Health.

Cira said not to pack more, but rather to use the time to talk to your kids about stress.

“What we should do is model how to be struggling human beings with flaws and show them it’s normal, inevitable,” she said.


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North County School News, November 21 https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/north-county-school-news-november-21/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 08:04:49 +0000 https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/north-county-school-news-november-21/ CARLSBAD Pacific Ridge welcomes South Asian dancers The South Asian Alliance Affinity Group recently shared a presentation of a celebration of Navaratri dance during a community life session at Pacific Ridge School. The students learned that Navaratri is a Hindu festival that spans nine nights and is celebrated every year in the fall. They were […]]]>

CARLSBAD

Pacific Ridge welcomes South Asian dancers

The South Asian Alliance Affinity Group recently shared a presentation of a celebration of Navaratri dance during a community life session at Pacific Ridge School. The students learned that Navaratri is a Hindu festival that spans nine nights and is celebrated every year in the fall. They were then treated to performances of Odissi, Rajasthani, Bharatanatyam and Bollywood dances, and even had the opportunity to participate and learn. Visit https://www.pacificridge.org; call (760) 448-9820.

Video “Being a parent in a digital world”

The Carlsbad Unified School District invites parents to Parent University from November 27 to December 31. 5 for a video presentation of “Parenting in a Digital World”. What apps are on your child’s phone? What social networks do they use? At what age should a child have a smartphone? Law enforcement professional Clayton Cranford, owner of Total Safety Solutions LLC, discusses these topics and more, including the risks associated with popular social media sites, sexting and online predators, how to define expectations and consequences, as well as parental controls and privacy settings. RSVP to Rosemary Eshelman at reshelman@carlsbadusd.net to receive the streaming link and password to watch this pre-recorded video.

NORTH COUNTY

The educators’ job fair is scheduled for December 4

The San Diego County Office of Education is hosting an Educators Career Fair from 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on December 4 to connect job seekers with school districts and charter schools across the county. A variety of teaching and non-teaching positions are available. The Career Fair is organized in partnership with Point Loma Nazarene University at the Liberty Station Conference Center, 2600 Laning Road, San Diego. Candidates can register at https://bit.ly/3CnN9Op for one of the three time slots: 8 a.m. to 9.45 a.m., 10 a.m. to 11:45 a.m., or noon to 1.45 p.m. Choose a time slot, bring a CV, and get dressed in a professional manner, as some districts may interview on site. Jobs available include substitute teachers, after-school program staff, bus drivers, campus supervisors, child nutrition assistants, catering professionals, health clerks, teaching aids and assistants, school attendants. maintenance, midday duty supervisors and nurses. Contact professorjobfair@sdcoe.net.

Virtual Student Summit on Opioids

SDNeeds2Know, a San Diego Juvenile Opioid Summit, will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. on December 16, presented by the San Diego County Attorney’s Office with the San Diego County Office of Education , chairman of the San Diego County Council. from supervisors Nathan Fletcher, Natural High, and others. The live-streamed assembly is free and open to middle and high school students in the county whose schools have registered at https://bit.ly/3mHDNbJ. Speakers will include former NBA basketball player Chris Herren, who has battled opioid addiction, and professional athletes Troy Polamalu and Joe Musgrove, who will share their thoughts.

Local students graduate

University of Eastern New Mexico, Portales, New Mexico: James Thomas de Fallbrook, Associate of Arts in General Studies

Carthage College, Kenosha, Wisconsin: Bradley Dodds from Carlsbad, Bachelor of Arts in Computer Science with a Minor in Business Administration

James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia: Emily Hoffman de Ramona, Bachelor of Social Work

Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania: James Johnson de Fallbrook, Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and Business, cum laude; Zane Ferguson from Escondido, Alexandre mow from Poway, and Angela Ding from Rancho Santa Fe, Bachelor of Science in Commerce and Economics

St. Francis University, Loretto, PA: Christian Griego de Carlsbad, Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Political Science

Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA: Allyson Pierick d’Escondido, Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration

Shenandoah College, Winchester, Virginia: Chih-Kun Chai from Carlsbad, Doctor of Pharmacy in Non-Traditional Pharmacy

BofA offers an internship opportunity

The Bank of America Student Leaders program offers qualified high school students the opportunity to complete a paid summer internship focused on community service. In addition to an eight-week internship with a local non-profit organization, each student will participate in the Student Leaders Summit in July 2022 in Washington, DC, with travel expenses paid by the program. Programming can become virtual, while waiting for health directives. Visit https://bit.ly/3HFw3j1 for an app. The application period ends on January 28.

SEEN

Craftsmen wanted for holiday shop

Craftsmen are needed for the Mission Meadows Holiday Craft store fundraiser, scheduled for December 8-10 and operated by Mission Meadows Elementary School PTA. Contact missionmeadowspta@gmail.com for more details and include “vacation shop” in the subject line of your email. Articles should be appropriate for the school.

Please send the articles to ncschools@sduniontribune.com at least two weeks before the events.


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Advice from the front lines https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/advice-from-the-front-lines/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 19:29:22 +0000 https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/advice-from-the-front-lines/ School librarians across the country have found themselves at the forefront of cultural wars. As states pass laws that restrict the teaching of ‘Controversial’ or ‘divisive’ topics, school libraries have seen calls to remove books on issues like race, gender and sexuality off their shelves. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, for example, wrote to his state’s […]]]>

School librarians across the country have found themselves at the forefront of cultural wars. As states pass laws that restrict the teaching of ‘Controversial’ or ‘divisive’ topics, school libraries have seen calls to remove books on issues like race, gender and sexuality off their shelves.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, for example, wrote to his state’s association of school boards this month, saying districts should remove “pornographic or obscene material” from school library shelves. This letter came after a state senator launched an investigation to find out if schools maintain a list of 850 book titles on issues such as transgender identity, AIDS, the history of the abortion debate and racial justice.

In Utah, one district immediately took off nine pounds– including The bluest eye by Toni Morrison – from school libraries after a parent said she worried about them after watching videos on social media.

But school librarians have a responsibility to bring together collections that represent all students, helping them to know and better understand themselves and the world around them, said Jennisen Lucas, president of the American Association of School Librarians.

In a tense political climate, school and district administrators need to prepare for book challenges before they arise, said Lucas, who is also the director of the Park County School District 6 library in Cody, Wyo.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

How does it feel to be a school librarian right now?

In short, it’s a bit scary.

It can be seen as an opportunity for us to really talk about what we are doing. But, because the discussion is being led by some sort of opposition, it makes it a bit more difficult to really put a positive spin on what it really means to have materials available to all of our society. It is not just the one who speaks the loudest or who has the majority of community members in his group.

It is as if it is essential for our democracy to ensure that we understand the multiple points of view of several people. We believe this in our hearts, but the controversy ends up being a bit difficult in practice, especially when you think about the fact that those who speak out have the best interests of children at heart as well.

Tell me more about what you mean by that.

A lot of people who are a lot of parents speaking out — they’re trying to protect their kids, and that’s a good and noble thing. We should always protect our children.

It’s great if you protect your own child; it becomes a censorship problem when you try to decide for everyone else what is right and wrong for them.

We’ve seen controversies over library books from authors like Judy Blume and Toni Morrison for years. Is this moment different from discussions of library content in the past?

It’s different … it’s much more national. It is not individual schools that are faced with this. We know that some groups are providing information nationally on some of these documents that go against certain views and beliefs.

In the past [the conversation] was, “We oppose this book. We would like to have it revised. We would like it to be removed from the library. But now it seems to be escalating … it’s not just about the [individual] pounds more. It is about access to information. And there is [school librarians] who receive threat messages on social networks. It crosses a line. We prefer to have a civil speech.

In what ways can school districts anticipate these discussions before they arise in a letter from a parent or in a tense school board meeting?

Check your policies and make sure you know them.

We encountered this in my district a few years ago … We ended up with a policy on how to select learning materials that did not address how to select library books. And so when we had a book challenge, the committee that was reviewing the books was confused about this difference between educational materials – those that are assigned to students – and library books, which are available to students, but no one is forcing you to read them. It opened our eyes to the fact that it was time to go back and look at our policies in this climate.

So make sure there is a policy [for selecting books], make sure you follow this policy, and make sure everyone is aware of it. And make sure there is a review policy [of a book’s inclusion in a school library]because part of the conflict will arise when a parent trying to express their views does not have a process by which they can be heard. The implementation of this policy also helps parents find their way around.

I have kept my administration informed of what is happening nationally. We don’t always pay attention to the little things that are going on in other neighborhoods, but it has become really important. This could very well happen to us, so we need to know if we are going to approach this issue and talk about it in a respectful, positive and non-adversarial way.

Tips for School and District Administrators

  • Review your library materials policies before books are challenged. Don’t wait until there is active controversy, said Jennisen Lucas, president of the American Association of School Librarians. Policies on the selection of library books should be separate from policies on textbooks and classroom materials. They should also include a clear document review process so parents and librarians know that any complaints are handled in a consistent and transparent manner.
  • Consider the context. Good district policy will encourage the complainant to read the entire work to put any worrying content into context, Lucas said. “In anything, if you just pull out a sentence or two, it can be very controversial.”
  • Build trust with parents. Parents’ concerns about their own children can often be addressed individually, and it often begins with a call to the school librarian, Lucas said.

What do you think about what to include in a school library collection and what should parents understand about it?

We think a lot about age adequacy and what we know about child development because school librarians are also qualified teachers. And so we kind of went through this thought process, “OK … this book might have a tough subject, but it’s designed for kids this age.” And then we look at our communities too and say, “Is this book going to be suitable for my community?”

And we’re also looking to make sure it’s connected, in that we can connect it to the curriculum. So if there are topics that are taught in our school, we want to make sure that we have the materials that the kids need to explore beyond what they are talking about in their classroom.

Part of the blur may be that we provide material for fun reading. For example, our grade 2 boys are very fond of off-road motorcycles. It’s not taught in our curriculum, but we want to make sure we have this material of interest because that’s how they’ll actually learn to read. Off-road motorcycles aren’t controversial, but it turns out that in my area zombies are.

So many of these problems in education right now feel like they are exacerbated by mistrust of schools or institutions in general. Is there anything school libraries can do to build trust with parents?

In our neighborhood, we wrote it specifically at the start of our [policy for challenging a library book] this [a parent] should come talk to me … Sometimes they have a concern for their child, and we can answer it. We will always support a parent about their own child.

We can put a note in the child’s file in our circulation system that says that at the request of the parents, they are not allowed to borrow certain books. For example, that [the child] is not allowed to read about zombies, witches and ghosts. And this can be for various reasons. This could be because of religious parenting concerns or just because their child is having nightmares.


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Woman arrested after threatening to ‘kill everyone’ inside Coweta County school, police say – WSB-TV Channel 2 https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/woman-arrested-after-threatening-to-kill-everyone-inside-coweta-county-school-police-say-wsb-tv-channel-2/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 03:28:00 +0000 https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/woman-arrested-after-threatening-to-kill-everyone-inside-coweta-county-school-police-say-wsb-tv-channel-2/ COWETA COUNTY, Georgia – A Coweta County elementary school has been closed after police said a woman threatened to kill everyone inside the school following an incident in the ‘bus stop. According to police reports, Brittany Laparis Arnold, 28, was caught on surveillance camera shouting curses at her children’s school bus monitor before letting them […]]]>

COWETA COUNTY, Georgia – A Coweta County elementary school has been closed after police said a woman threatened to kill everyone inside the school following an incident in the ‘bus stop.

According to police reports, Brittany Laparis Arnold, 28, was caught on surveillance camera shouting curses at her children’s school bus monitor before letting them board.

[DOWNLOAD: Free WSB-TV News app for alerts as news breaks]

Later that day, Atkinson Elementary School vice-principal Monica Keel and Coweta County bus supervisor Fate Simmons made the decision not to allow Arnold’s children to take the bus to go home that afternoon.

When Keel called Arnold to inform him that she would need to pick her children up from school, they were greeted with more rude yelling from Arnold, according to the police report. He goes on to say that Arnold threatened to jump in front of the school bus and let him hit her before hanging up.

TRENDING STORIES:

When the bus arrived at Arnold’s home and the children were not on board, she called the school and was informed that the children were in school waiting to be picked up.

The report says Arnold told the clerk that if she “were to find a way to get to Atkinson, she would smash all the windows on the bus and murder everyone in the school.” The school was then placed in “code yellow” lock.

MPs found Arnold holding a broomstick outside the bus in Beverly Park Court and were arrested. School is back to normal.

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There is no word at this time on the charges against Arnold.

IN OTHER NEWS:


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Spotsylvania County cancels vote to remove sexually explicit books from school libraries https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/spotsylvania-county-cancels-vote-to-remove-sexually-explicit-books-from-school-libraries/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 10:30:00 +0000 https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/spotsylvania-county-cancels-vote-to-remove-sexually-explicit-books-from-school-libraries/ Spotsylvania County cancels vote to remove sexually explicit books from school libraries A Northern Virginia school board overturned a vote that would have removed sexually explicit books from school libraries. SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, Virginia (FOX 5 DC) – A Northern Virginia school board overturned a vote that would have removed sexually explicit books from school libraries. […]]]>

A Northern Virginia school board overturned a vote that would have removed sexually explicit books from school libraries.

The vote took place early Tuesday morning after a fiery school board meeting in Spotsylvania County, Va., On Monday evening. Lindsay Watts of FOX 5 says the board has been reminded that there is a process to challenge library books that may have inappropriate content.

The decision to cancel the vote follows a meeting in which dozens of parents, students, staff and community members spoke angrily and passionately about the board’s decision to withdraw books.

Download the FOX 5 DC News app for the latest local news and weather

Public comments went on for hours on Monday night with 68 people signing up to speak.

“You made local, state and national news and not for a good reason,” said one woman.

A man who said he was a librarian choked.

READ MORE: Potential thief calls 911 after victim shoots him at Spotsylvania County ATM

“I can’t believe I’m standing here tonight in a school board, I’m getting emotional, in America in 2021 and I have to talk about the book ban,” he said.

Others spoke of the Nazi book burnings. Several students shared their anger.

“I have a message from each student to your school board: you failed us! A student told the board.

Another told about a book he said saved his life while he was feeling suicidal.

The Council’s decision last week was prompted solely by a mother and father who appeared before Council to say they discovered two books they found inappropriate in their daughter’s high school library.

PREVIOUS COVER: Spotsylvania County Removes Library Books From Schools Containing “Sexually Explicit Content”

The couple were angry with ‘Call Me By Your Name’, which is about a 17-year-old boy who has an affair with a man, and ’33 Snowfish ‘, a story about homeless children, one of whom has been sexually assaulted. .

The board entered into a discussion that was not on the agenda and ultimately decided to remove all “sexually explicit” books from school libraries, without surgically defining what that meant and what type of books could. be checked out.

Many who spoke on Monday directed anger at board members Kirk Twigg and Rabih Abuismail who said the books should be burned. Abuismail also claimed that the school librarians had failed.

Abuismail told FOX 5 on Wednesday that he spoke badly about burning books. Twigg has denied ever saying it, even though the meeting is on video.

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The board was to make a final decision on what to do next.

Board member Baron Braswell noted that the school board attorney said what they had done about these books was unconstitutional and that he intended to bring a motion to cancel last week’s vote.


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BEA school board discusses teacher contracts | News, Sports, Jobs https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/bea-school-board-discusses-teacher-contracts-news-sports-jobs/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 14:24:48 +0000 https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/bea-school-board-discusses-teacher-contracts-news-sports-jobs/ BLUE EARTH – The Blue Earth Area School Board and the Blue Earth Area Education Association are heading towards mediation for a new two-year teaching contract. School board member Sara Hauskins presented a report from the board negotiating committee at the BEA board meeting on Monday evening. Hauskins detailed the 12 meetings between the bargaining […]]]>

BLUE EARTH – The Blue Earth Area School Board and the Blue Earth Area Education Association are heading towards mediation for a new two-year teaching contract.

School board member Sara Hauskins presented a report from the board negotiating committee at the BEA board meeting on Monday evening.

Hauskins detailed the 12 meetings between the bargaining committee and representatives of the teachers’ union.

Those meetings began on May 13, Hauskins said, and the most recent was on October 27.

Over the course of the 12 meetings, the board put forward several proposals for salary and benefit increases, and the Education Association also responded with several of its own proposals.

The board’s highest increase proposal was about 5.2% over two years, while the highest amount opposed by the teachers’ union was a 7.7% increase over two years, their proposal the lowest increase being 6.76%.

However, all of the proposals included different options, some with changes in salary increments, corrections in “Failure” in the current timeline and other things that cause the numbers to change somewhat in each proposal.

“At the end of our October 27 meeting, the EA said it was going to seek mediation,” said Hauskins. “The mediation hearing is unlikely to be heard until December, due to the date the mediator will be available.”

At the start of the meeting, the Board of Directors also heard from BEA EA Co-Chairs Kim Sickler and Barb Carlson talk about the dedication of the current staff and how they chose to be at BEA, returning annually to the experienced staff and looking forward to a fair and fair negotiation.

In other matters during the meeting of Monday, November 8, the BEA Board of Directors:

– I heard an update from staff members Jenn Berkner and Dar Holmseth on marketing Blue Earth Area.

The report included information on the use of the BEA logo on all materials, as well as a competition held to design a new Buccaneer mascot.

The competition is open to everyone and a committee hopes to announce the winning design before Christmas.

– I heard an update from Directors Dave Dressler and Conan Schaffer, as well as Curriculum Director Allison Schmidt, regarding District Vision Cards for District Leadership Teams.

The six visions relate to helping students in a number of ways, including reaching grade level and working to stay on track to graduation.

– Approved staff items, including a contract for David Kittleson as a gifted and talented coordinator, the hiring of Cora Pierson and LaDonna Dutton as temporary part-time COVID nurses, and Robyn Johnson and Andrea Schewe as the paraprofessionals, and Michael Reasor as caretaker.

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Spotsylvania School Board Orders Libraries To Remove “Sexually Explicit” Books | Education https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/spotsylvania-school-board-orders-libraries-to-remove-sexually-explicit-books-education/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://superheroteachertoolkit.com/spotsylvania-school-board-orders-libraries-to-remove-sexually-explicit-books-education/ “It’s up to us to make sure that whatever the policy says we need to do, we do it, and if anything needs to be strengthened, it’s up to us to do it,” Sims said. But Abuismail said whatever processes in place “didn’t work” and demanded an immediate audit of all library holdings in the […]]]>

“It’s up to us to make sure that whatever the policy says we need to do, we do it, and if anything needs to be strengthened, it’s up to us to do it,” Sims said.

But Abuismail said whatever processes in place “didn’t work” and demanded an immediate audit of all library holdings in the school division.

He said he didn’t like the idea of ​​Rapp’s book being on the school division library shelves for one more night and that being in a school library means the public schools “would rather our children read gay pornography than talk about Christ.”

Abuismail accused Division Superintendent Scott Baker of not being proactive in reviewing school library holdings before parents raised concerns.

“Dr. Baker, you saw this coming from Northern Virginia, didn’t you remember to check out what’s in our libraries?” He asked.

Baker said he would take responsibility for any failure in the library book selection process.

“I wouldn’t have thought of doing an audit because I have great faith in our librarians,” he said. “If we find something missing in a process, then we refine the process. There was no bad intention here. We don’t have all the information.

Battlefield rep Baron Braswell noted that what one person finds offensive another person might not be, and he also asked division staff for time to review their internal processes.


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